Barone Sergio – Sergio 2010, the naked essence of Nero d’Avola

Pure, unadulterated, naked in his essence. “Sergio is Nero d’Avola as it should be” in the mind of Baron Giovanni Sergio: without any contribution from wood. This red wine, so typical of Sicily, is derived from the island’s native grape par excellence: the Nero d’Avola. The Barone Sergio company is located in the heart of its typical cultivation area: southeastern Sicily, in the province of Syracuse. The vineyards are located in two districts: Le Mandrie and Gaudioso. This is the territory of Eloro Doc, one of the least known in the island.

Boroli – Cerequio 2012, the young and impudent Barolo aiming high

Today’s top wine comes from the vineyard of Cerequio hill, 300 meters above sea level, shared by the towns of Barolo and La Morra, in the province of Cuneo (Piedmont region, North-West Italy). This is the historical Langhe area, recognized as a world heritage site by UNESCO. The Cerequio is a first class cru vineyard: the Boroli-owned Nebbiolo grapes are grown in the municipality of Barolo.

Quadra – QSaten 2009 – The revolutionary and unconventional Franciacorta

Quadra_1Today’s wine is the brainchild of Mario Falcetti (oenologist and agronomist, former Contadi Castaldi, Terra Moretti group), and it has the distinction of being produced by a winery I like to call “unconventional”. Falcetti, the manager of the Quadra winery since 2008, has a reputation for taking things into his own hands and revolutionizing both management philosophy and winemaking techniques.

Le Potazzine – Brunello Gorelli 2012, a mark of purest tradition

Among the many excellent Brunellos I have tasted over the years, there’s one that has positively impressed me for its authentic “slow” style and respect for tradition. Its name is Brunello di Montalcino Gorelli 2012 Le Potazzine.

After that glowing introduction, I guess I should regale you with the brief story of a young winery, owned by Giuseppe Gorelli and his wife Gigliola Giannetti, who now run a winemaking business along with their daughters Viola and Sofia, while still being respectful of the Brunello di Montalcino tradition.

Planeta Dorilli Vittoria 2014 – The perfect blend from South-East Sicily

From the land known as the birthplace of Nero d’Avola comes Cerasuolo di Vittoria by Planeta.
Planeta is a winery that, over the past 25 years, has dedicated itself to spreading the fame of Sicilian wines worldwide. Production is spread over five different territories of the largest island in the Mediterranean, under the careful oversight of Alessio, Francesca and Santi Planeta: their forward-thinking, yet at the same time careful activity has allowed them to “churn” extremely high-quality wines out of all their cellars.

Giuseppe Rinaldi – Brunate Le Coste 2005, the traditional winning Barolo

The prototype of an exceptional year for the whole Barolo district is the cru Brunate – Le Coste vintage 2005 by Giuseppe Rinaldi.
I had the opportunity to taste it, much to my delight, during the latest “Barolo Brunello” held at Montalcino.

I almost immediately realized that a single glass of this wine encompasses the science and the essence of this land’s own Nebbiolo.
The Giuseppe Rinaldi estate is, in fact, one of the representatives of classic Barolo, belonging to the traditional school and eschewing more modern techniques.

The volcanic wine from the urban vineyard in Rome: Fiorano Rosso 2010

Today I’d like to tell you about an authentic urban vineyard and his best and most prestigious wine: Fiorano Rosso by Tenuta di Fiorano, a farm located inside the Rome municipal area in the natural park of Appia Antica, only a few miles as the crow flies from Ciampino airport. And yet, in spite of its proximity to the hustle and bustle of the capital, this large property of 200 hectares – of which 6 are employed for growing vines – almost seems to reside in a dreamlike world, far from the noise and the chaos.

Stefania Barbot and the “other Aglianico”: Irpinia Campi Taurasini “ION” 2013

ion-stefania-barbotIrpinia is, without a doubt, a great land for red wine (but also for white wines). Also known as the province of Avellino, north of Naples, it’s the home of Aglianico, its most important red vine and the source of the most structured wines on the market. Such grapes are particularly suited for cultivation in the Taurasi Docg territory, which employs them in order to produce an excellent southern Italian red wine: the Taurasi, which some oenological critics have described as “Barolo of the South”.